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Two exhibitions commemorate November pogroms of 1938 and beginning of Kindertransport

Two Exhibitions commemorate November pogroms of 1938 and beginning of Kindertransport

Two Exhibitions commemorate November pogroms of 1938 and beginning of Kindertransport, © German Embassy London

28.02.2018 - Press release

On Tuesday 27 February, Chargé d‘Affaires a. i. Tania Freiin von Uslar-Gleichen opened the exhibitions "Finchleystraße – German Artists in Exile in Great Britain and Beyond 1933 – 45" and "Jewish Life in Germany Today" at the German House, 34 Belgrave Square.

Both exhibitions commemorate the November pogroms of 1938 and the subsequent beginning of the Kindertransport to Great Britain.

Finchleystraße – as bus conductors used to call out at the local Finchley Road stop recognising the influx of German-speaking émigrés to North London during the 1930s - has been curated by Ben Uri Gallery.

The exhibition focuses primarily on German-Jewish artists who had to flee Nazi-Germany – some of them as children on the Kindertransport.

Artists like Frank Auerbach and Lucian Freud eventually became two of Britain’s most respected and best-known artists today. However, some of the artists who were forced to leave Germany in later life suffered fractures of their careers due to their compelled migration.

Thankfully, 80 years after the November pogroms and the beginning of the Kindertransport, once again there is a diverse and growing Jewish community in Germany. The poster exhibition Jewish Life in Germany Today bears witness to this.   

Both exhibitions will be open to the public on Thursday, 8 March, from 4pm – 8.30pm.

Click here for more information. Registration is essential.

Additional content

To commemorate the November Pogroms of 1938 and the beginning of the Kindertransport to Great Britain, the Embassy presents two exhibitions. Sign up here for the next open day on 13 September.

Open day for exhibitions at the German Embassy

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